The next interview in the series from our Annual Report 2014 is with our postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oslo, Kjetil Indrevær.

 

What is your scientific background? I undertook my Master’s degree and PhD at the University of Tromsø in Structural Geology. I studied structures (faults) in Troms that formed as a part of the opening of the Norwegian- Greenland Sea, and on the relationship between these structures onshore and offshore. With this background, it felt very natural to continue in ARCEx, as the work addressed here is directly linked to my previous experience.

 

Kjetil is here studying fault rocks in Troms, Northern Norway (greenish zone dipping at an angle from Kjetil towards the lower right corner). The faults onshore link up with the faults offshore and are a vital part of the evolution of the Barents Sea (Photo: Kjetil Indrevær).
Kjetil is here studying fault rocks in Troms, Northern Norway (greenish zone dipping at an angle from Kjetil towards the lower right corner). The faults onshore link up with the faults offshore and are a vital part of the evolution of the Barents Sea (Photo: Kjetil Indrevær).

What topics are addressed in your project? The work is currently focused on inversion structures within the Barents Sea, i.e. structures that formed due to short events of compression in an overall extensional regime. The Barents Sea has been subjected to massive extension throughout the several hundred million years the break- up lasted. It is therefore quite counter-intuitive to find evidence of compression within this setting. That makes it even more important to understand them, as they may likely give us important clues to how continents behave during rifting.

 

 

 

What are your main expectations/results? The aim is to identify and map the inversion structures and to pinpoint when and why they formed. Some events of inversion may be caused by local stresses, possibly caused by rotation and/or movement of neighbouring fault blocks, while others may be connected to large- scale tectonics. They likely formed for different reasons and at different times depending on where in the Barents Sea they are located.

The understanding of the inversion in the Barents Sea is important in relation to hydrocarbon exploration, as they (i) give detail to our understanding of the development of basins and thus the potential maturing of source rocks and (ii) inversion structures tend to form dome-like structures that in turn may act as hydrocarbon traps (which is likely the case in e.g. Ormen Lange Dome in the Norwegian Sea and the Shtokman field in the Barents Sea). Getting the timing right for when they formed in relation to the maturing and migration of hydrocarbons is, therefore, key.

Kjetil Indrevær er postdoktor ved Institutt for Geofag ved Unviersitetet i Oslo. Han er strukturgeolog og arbeider for tiden med forkastningsaktivitet og bassenganalyse i det sørvestre Barentshavet gjennom ARCEx. 

 

Ormen Lange Dome (Image from Kjetil Indrevær).
Ormen Lange Dome (Image from Kjetil Indrevær).

Other things/topics you would like to highlight? I feel very privileged to be a part of ARCEx, as we will likely play an important role in the Arctic in the coming years. ARCEx will hopefully be an arena where universities and industry can meet to share knowledge to everyone’s benefit. Knowledge is king!